Scene 8

(Bhupendra Nath Dutt, brother of Swami Vivekananda, and Aurobindo)

BHUPEN: You know I have been accused of sedition for two articles in the Sandhya. But I wish to offer defence in court.

AURO: Defence! You, Bhupendra Nath Dutt, brother of the indomitable Narendra Nath Dutt, will offer defence! No, never shall you do so.

BHUPEN: But why? May I know the cause of your objection?

AURO: It is very simple. Bhupen, it does not become you, a fiery revolutionary, to recognise an alien court. You must always be ready to meet prosecution with absolute indifference. You must accept all punishments in utter silence as a matter of course with erect head and dauntless heart. This is the spirit with which you must be surcharged to drive away the British from India.

BHUPEN: I am now convinced, Chief. And I consider myself to be a thing of some worth, for it is from you that I have taken oath of the revolutionary movement. I am ever at your service.

AURO: Bhupen, be sure, India cannot perish. Ours is a race that can by no means become extinct. In us is the abode of Sanatana Dharma, the Eternal Religion. A day shall come when this Religion of ours will be the future Religion of the entire world. Our high mission is to purge barbarism out of humanity and to Aryanise the world. To this end India must recognise herself first. This is the peerless work. To initiate this work Sri Ramakrishna came into the world. His dearest disciple, Naren, walked through fire and water to preach it all over the world.

BHUPEN: I needs must remain beholden to God at least for one thing.

AURO: (Bursting into laughter) That's fine. You are not much indebted to God. Only for one thing ... And what is it?

BHUPEN: It is this, that God had not sent his representatives — Ramakrishna, Vivekananda and Aurobindo — at one and the same time. Ramakrishna played his divine role in secret and left the earth. Now, Chief, you have come on the scene. I am sure you, too, will meet with tremendous success. If God had sent all the three at a time, undoubtedly I would have been a terrible loser.

AURO: How do you mean?

BHUPEN: That I need not explain to you, for you have already read my mind and felt my heart.

Chinmoy Kumar Ghose, The Descent of the Blue.First published by Sri Chinmoy Lighthouse in 1972.

This is the 3000th book that Sri Chinmoy has written since he came to the West, in 1964.

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by Chinmoy Kumar Ghose
From the book The Descent of the Blue, made available to share under a Creative Commons license

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